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Thread: Corona virus

  1. #1711
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    My wife comes home yesterday and one of her workmates was sent home to quarantine. My wife called to check on her. She said she had been feeling sick and got tested. They told her the tests results wont be back for 10 days.
    That surprised me! I didnt realize people were having to wait ten to fourteen days. Hopefully she will be feeling better by the time she gets the results back but that means many people who test positive already have quarantined and feel better.

    Another workmate of my wife went in for surgery. She had to be tested before the surgery and she got results back in a couple hours.

    That is a big contrast from 2 hours to 10 days.

  2. #1712
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanDB View Post
    Based on the opening pitch, Dr. Fauci is a much better doctor than a pitcher!

    I try to remind my little girl-
    Don't throw it to me, throw it THROUGH me!

    Hopefully soon the good Doc has time to work on it.

  3. #1713
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    Mar 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by atwaterandstir View Post
    I try to remind my little girl-
    Don't throw it to me, throw it THROUGH me!

    Hopefully soon the good Doc has time to work on it.
    On the lighter side....he needs to flatten his curve. (or whatever that was)



  4. #1714
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    May 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by 58Miller View Post
    My wife comes home yesterday and one of her workmates was sent home to quarantine. My wife called to check on her. She said she had been feeling sick and got tested. They told her the tests results won’t be back for 10 days.
    That surprised me! I didn’t realize people were having to wait ten to fourteen days. Hopefully she will be feeling better by the time she gets the results back but that means many people who test positive already have quarantined and feel better.

    Another workmate of my wife went in for surgery. She had to be tested before the surgery and she got results back in a couple hours.

    That is a big contrast from 2 hours to 10 days.
    Yeah that's.... really poor. Not sure why they have to wait 10 days. It's usually a day to two days here in WI....

  5. #1715
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    Nov 2004
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    I think it depends on how one gets tested and it may have something to do with how many people are using those labs.

    Little under a month ago here were some wait times in my area.

    Free County tests - 6-10 business days
    Test through my doctor via professional medial labs - 3-5 days
    Test paid 100% out of pocket through professional labs - 1-2 days

    My guess is more people use the free option than other two options. More people use their doctors than going to something 100% out of pocket.

  6. #1716
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadez View Post
    I think it depends on how one gets tested and it may have something to do with how many people are using those labs.

    Little under a month ago here were some wait times in my area.

    Free County tests - 6-10 business days
    Test through my doctor via professional medial labs - 3-5 days
    Test paid 100% out of pocket through professional labs - 1-2 days

    My guess is more people use the free option than other two options. More people use their doctors than going to something 100% out of pocket.
    I think 3-5 days is reasonable, pending how busy things get. My test results came back within 36 hours, but it was a very slow time here, so resourcing was not an issue. It's difficult though if the results aren't known for 5 or more days because you may be isolated....and if tested positive, you will need to add another couple of weeks minimum to your active return.

  7. #1717
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    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.

  8. #1718
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    Iowa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.
    Glad to hear that 👍

  9. #1719
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.
    That's good news pal!

  10. #1720
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.
    It's a blessing.

  11. #1721
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanDB View Post
    .............

    As an aside....another stat I really believe is important is "long term damage" as a result of the virus. Deaths are clearly an awful result, as is being placed in Intensive Care. But if I tested positive, survived, BUT ended up with some nasty longer term issue, that would be a very bad and lasting impact on my life.
    Following are excerpts from an article by Henry I. Miller - M.S. M.D. on July 22nd. I think it very important to understand, because death rates may be substantial, but it is critical that we learn the potential long term effects of this virus, to truly gauge it's impact.

    COVID-19 is more than a transient respiratory infection. Although it often presents with pulmonary symptoms, and can cause severe pneumonia (which can lead to “post-Covid pulmonary fibrosis),” there have been numerous reports of non-respiratory manifestations, including loss of sense of smell or taste, confusion and cognitive impairments, fainting, sudden muscle weakness or paralysis, abnormal blood-coagulation tests, seizures, ischemic strokes, kidney damage, and, rarely, a severe pediatric inflammatory syndrome.

    Moreover, recovery is often incomplete, with various symptoms persisting after the acute infection itself has subsided. A recent article published in the journal JAMA found that, in a small study of patients who had recovered from COVID-19, 87.4% reported persistence of at least one symptom, particularly fatigue and dyspnea (i.e., shortness of breath).

    Possibly overlapping with Dr. Morris’s “3 or more category” are reports of patients experiencing long-term adverse effects that resemble a condition variously known as myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). As the name suggests, ME/CFS is a syndrome, or a group of symptoms that seem to characterize or define an illness, even if we don’t know how they’re related or what causes them. (Syndromes differ from better-understood, more clearly defined illnesses such as solid tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, or stroke, for example).

    The signs and symptoms of ME/CFS may include fatigue, loss of memory or concentration, sore throat, swelling of the neck or armpit lymph nodes, unexplained muscle or joint pain, headaches, non-restorative sleep, and extreme exhaustion that lasts more than 24 hours after physical exercise or mental stimulation (“post-exertional malaise”). People with ME/CFS are often incapable of performing ordinary activities, and sometimes become completely debilitated, unable even to get out of bed. (A good account of ME/CFS was provided in an interview of three COVID-19 patients on NPR’s July 11 broadcast of “Weekend Edition,” who described, in poignant terms, their ongoing symptoms and their frustration).

    The manifestations of ME/CFS can persist for years, although we can’t yet know what the typical, long-term post-COVID-19 symptomatology will be. What we do know, however, is that in recent decades, outbreaks of other infectious diseases, including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) (both of which are also caused by coronaviruses), as well as West Nile virus, H1N1 influenza, and Ebola—have all been followed by a range of long-term complaints that resemble those of ME/CFS. Therefore, it’s no surprise to see this phenomenon repeated in COVID-19 patients.

    The appearance of serious COVID-19 sequelae, such as ME/CFS, has important implications.

    First, fatalities aside, the increase in cases and the high numbers of hospitalizations in epicenters of infection cannot be dismissed as simply a self-limited, “flu-like illness.” For one thing, the effects of the common flu are usually done and gone in a week or so, but we are realizing that, as shown in the figure above, various effects of COVID-19 often persist.

    These findings are a potent argument for aggressively suppressing and mitigating COVID-19. The fewer new cases, the fewer lingering illnesses there will be—with all their attendant misery and expense. (Corollaries: “COVID parties” are dangerous and colossally stupid, as is letting infections spread to attain “herd immunity,” which, in any case, will fail.)

    Second, the persistence of debilitating symptoms argues strongly against vaccine “challenge trials,” in which infectious SARS-CoV-2 virus is intentionally administered to test subjects, some of whom have received a trial vaccine while others have gotten a placebo. In the absence of very effective drugs to treat COVID-19, such studies would, in my opinion, be unethical. Dr. Michael Rosenblatt, entrepreneur and former dean of the Tufts University School of Medicine, has offered additional persuasive arguments against challenge trials—including delays in performing them, the question of their broad applicability (given that they would likely be performed in lower-risk, young people), and the possibility that deaths or significant morbidity in the test subjects could retard research.

    Finally, we need to prioritize research on the long-term effects of COVID-19.


    If anyone has longer term health issue stats (as related to covid-19) that are valid, given the early era of covid-19, please share.

  12. #1722
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.
    Great news!
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  13. #1723
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.
    That is great news!

  14. #1724
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.
    Never met you, hate your football team, but man I was thinking about you and your family and hoped for the best. This is awesome news!

  15. #1725
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
    My dad and stepmom both seem to be fully recovered now.
    Most excellent news!
    http://s7.postimg.org/hjr8fcmaz/EM2.jpg

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