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    The World War II Thread

    Here we can discuss World War II history, weapons, equipment, share maps, photos, artwork and personal stories.

    Have a relative who fought in this war? Please tell us all about it!

    I've had a passionate interest in this subject for about forty years and have studied the Pacific Theater (PTO), European Theater (ETO) and Atlantic, the China/Burma/India theater (CBI), obscure battles in South America, Central and South Africa, and the Middle East, the Holocaust, homefronts, interwar years and causes of the conflict, and alternate histories ("what if's").
    Last edited by L.M.; 03-29-2020 at 11:13 AM.
    Superbowl 50 MVP Von Miller on February 7th, 2016

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    Quote Originally Posted by L.M. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jazzbodog View Post
    Great minds think alike. Exactly the first thing I thought of when I read the thread title.

    For those who don't know what the video clip is....it's from the 1975? movie "Midway" showing a Japanese naval aircraft carrier commander commenting to other officers on the bridge about their attack at Pearl Harbor Hawaii, 7 December 1941. Classic line!
    Quote Originally Posted by L.M. View Post
    It's from the 1970 film Tora! Tora! Tora! and that's So Yamamura playing Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto who (reluctantly) planned the attack on Pearl Harbor on Tojo's orders. That's a true quote too.
    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    Yamamoto wanted to catch our flattops at Pearl, but they were out. Given that, wonder why he thought they'd be in Pearl when he attacked Midway?
    Quote Originally Posted by L.M. View Post
    Because after Manila and Guam fell, Pearl was the only forward US naval base left and it was extremely well-protected with increased flak batteries and more land-based fighters so a second Japanese aerial strike there would have been suicidal. Admiral Nimitz HQ was also there. The carriers were at Pearl until they got that vital intel on Japanese plans and then they redeployed NE of Midway. The Yorktown was making repairs at Pearl from damage suffered at Coral Sea. The Japanese mistakenly believed that she was actually sunk and only factored two enemy carriers into their plans, not three (technically, the US had four as Midway Island itself was effectively an unsinkable carrier). Yamamoto's plan was to lure the American carriers out to defend Midway after it had been attacked and neutralized.
    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    The story of Yorktown making it back to Pearl from Coral Sea, getting underway in three days to join Enterprise and Hornet, and then doing major damage control again after getting bombed during the battle is truly epic. The crew would have saved her had a Japanese sub not slipped through the screen. A destroyer was sunk by one of the torpedoes intended for Yorktown. CV-10, one of the Essex Class carriers, was named Yorktown to carry on the tradition established by CV-5.
    Quote Originally Posted by L.M. View Post
    Yorktown definitely helped to tip the scales in that fight as her dive bombers destroyed the Sōryū. In 1998, Robert Ballard (who found the Titanic and Bismarck) found the old Yorktown wreck three miles deep.

    The Hornet CV-8 was sunk about five months later in the contest for the Solomons which was the true turning point of the Pacific War (though Midway is often cited as such), and like the Yorktown, she was reincarnated as an Essex class carrier CV-12 in 1943. The old Hornet wreck was found last year by Paul Allen -the cofounder of Microsoft- who has been spending some of his fortune locating WW2 wrecks. His research vessel the RV Petrel found the Lexington in the Coral Sea in 2018, and the Kaga and Akagi near Midway last year. The Hiryū and Sōryū are still lost. The Enterprise survived WW2 intact and was decommissioned in 1947, then reincarnated as the first nuclear-powered carrier CVN-65 in 1958.
    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    Lt.Cdr. Dick Best, SBD squadron commander from Enterprise, scored hits on Akagi and Hiryu. His OBA malfunctioned and he inhaled caustic soda fumes which caused latent TB to go active. The last day he flew was 4 June 1942. What a day. Denver area residents might be interested to know that Best was sent to Fitzsimmons Army Hospital in Aurora (NW quadrant of East Colfax and Peoria) to rest, recuperate and receive treatment in a better climate for his condition. ⚓🇺🇸
    Quote Originally Posted by jazzbodog View Post
    Wow! You and LM are impressing the heck out of me with your WWII Pacific theater knowledge. Over the decades I've focused more on WWII European combat theater. That's due to me falling in love with the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress when I was a youngster in the late 1950's. I was fortunate to fly in the B-17G "Liberty Belle" May 7th 2011 here in Salt Lake City. It was an incredible "bucket list" dream come true.

    Thanks again my Bronco brothers for the info.
    I'm very envious -I love this plane too (and most WW2 aircraft, honestly). I would assume you've seen the 1990 film Memphis Belle? I used to know a guy who flew one over Germany in WW2.

    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    The contest for the Solomon Islands included the First Marine Division on Guadalcanal commanded by Gen. A.A. Vandegrift. That was another epic struggle. JFK's saga on PT-109 also took place in the Solomon Islands during that campaign (the message on the coconut). The plane carrying Admiral Yamamoto in the Solomons, was shot down by USAAF P-38s, who had been sent there as a result of more codebreaking, which resulted in his death thus depriving the Japanese of their best commander.
    I would guess you are familiar with the HBO series The Pacific? If not I recommend it, it's well done. The first two episodes cover the Marines at Guadalcanal based on the memoirs of Harold Leckie who wrote Helmet For My Pillow as well as accounts of John Basilone, the hero of that battle who won the medal of honor and then later died on Iwo Jima. The series is also about Eugene Sledge who wrote With the Old Breed.

    The film The Thin Red Line is also about the U.S. Army at Guadalcanal (after the Marines had pulled out) and sports an all-star cast. It was nominated for best picture but lost to Saving Private Ryan (one of my favorites).

    I also recommend a great Japanese film called Isoroku Yamamoto made in 2011 if you can find it. The FX aren't as good as the recent Midway film but they are decent. Here's the trailer:

    Superbowl 50 MVP Von Miller on February 7th, 2016

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    Quote Originally Posted by L.M. View Post
    I'm very envious -I love this plane too (and most WW2 aircraft, honestly). I would assume you've seen the 1990 film Memphis Belle? I used to know a guy who flew one over Germany in WW2.
    Excellent! There are no "not cool" combat aircraft" that were involved in WWII.
    Although they had some excellent fighting machines, I'm not going to list any German or Japanese aircraft.
    American and British aircraft were superior, IMO.

    My list of favorites:

    Bombers
    B-17G Flying Fortress (USA)
    B-29 Super Fortress (USA)
    Lancaster (British)
    B-24J Liberator (USA)

    Fighters (For those who might not know, the P stands for "Pursuit", the F is for "Fighter")
    P-51 Mustang
    F4U Corsair
    Spitfire (British)
    P-47M Thunderbolt
    P-38J Lightning
    F6F-5 Hellcat

    You assumed correctly. I've seen the movie "Memphis Belle" and I have the DVD. I also have the DVD of "Twelve O'clock High", 1949, staring Gregory Peck. Excellent movie. Winner of 2 academy awards for best supporting actor (Dean Jagger) and best sound.

    I have a friend of 51 years from high school who lives in Windsor, Colorado and we have everything in place for a trip this June to the airshow in Dayton, Ohio and we're also going to the U.S. Air Force Museum located at Wright-Patterson AFB, a little North East of Dayton. The star attraction there is the one and only "Memphis Belle", the real McCoy. My friend and I are super stoked to make this trip but we're starting to think the Coronavirus might force us to cancel for circumstances beyond our control. Huge bummer.

    The following is the final journey of the "Memphis Belle", aka "The Lady", "The Big Bird."

    On 30 August 2005, the MBMA (Memphis Belle Memorial Association) announced that a consultant that they hired determined that the MBMA would not be able to raise enough money to restore the Belle and otherwise fulfill the Air Force's requirements to keep possession of the aircraft. They announced plans to return the aircraft to the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB near Dayton, Ohio, after a final exhibition at an airshow in Millington, Tennessee from 30 September–2 October 2005. The Belle arrived safely at the museum in mid-October 2005 and was placed in one of the Museum's restoration hangars.

    The Museum placed restoration of Memphis Belle near the top of its priorities. In the magazine Friends Journal of the museum's foundation, Major General Charles D. Metcalf, USAF (Ret), then the director of the museum, stated that it might take eight to 10 years to fully restore the aircraft.

    By the spring of 2009, considerable preparatory work had been accomplished, but the fuselage and wings were still disassembled.

    After stripping the paint from the aft fuselage of the aircraft, hundreds of names and personal messages were found scratched in the aluminum skin. It turned out that, during the aircraft's war bond tour, people were allowed to leave their mark there.

    In May 2017 the museum announced the goal of completing the restoration and putting the Memphis Belle on display by May 17, 2018, the 75th anniversary of the plane's 25th mission. On March 19, 2018 the Memphis Belle was moved into the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, and was officially unveiled May 17, 2018.

    Nothing less than incredibly amazing!
    Last edited by jazzbodog; 03-27-2020 at 10:18 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzbodog View Post
    I have a friend of 51 years from high school who lives in Windsor, Colorado and we have everything in place for a trip this June to the airshow in Dayton, Ohio and we're also going to the U.S. Air Force Museum located at Wright-Patterson AFB, a little North East of Dayton. The star attraction there is the one and only "Memphis Belle", the real McCoy. My friend and I are super stoked to make this trip but we're starting to think the Coronavirus might force us to cancel for circumstances beyond our control. Huge bummer.
    I forgot to mention that my friend in Windsor, Colorado, that his 22 year old father was a P-47 Thunderbolt (aka the "Jug") pilot in Europe and he received all of his dad's WWII memorabilia and it's impressive. He set up a large 8' x 8' area on a wall in his basement man cave show casing everything, medals, photos standing next to his plane and much more. But what was also amazing was an approximately 20 minute 8mm film (his dad had it copied to VHS in the 1980's and my friend had it copied to a DVD) that was footage recorded in the nose of his dads P-47 of him attempting and actually shooting down German Messerschmitt Bf 109's and Focke-Wulf 190's and also shows footage of him strafing German trains, parked aircraft, troop vehicle convoys, buildings...anything helping the German war effort. Apparently when he returned from a mission he persuaded the people removing and developing the combat film to make a copy and add it to the previous missions film clips.
    While watching the DVD (Oct 2018) I don't think I blinked but 2 or 3 times. I was blown away with what I was watching.

    Astonishing!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzbodog View Post
    I forgot to mention that my friend in Windsor, Colorado, that his 22 year old father was a P-47 Thunderbolt (aka the "Jug") pilot in Europe and he received all of his dad's WWII memorabilia and it's impressive. He set up a large 8' x 8' area on a wall in his basement man cave show casing everything, medals, photos standing next to his plane and much more. But what was also amazing was an approximately 20 minute 8mm film (his dad had it copied to VHS in the 1980's and my friend had it copied to a DVD) that was footage recorded in the nose of his dads P-47 of him attempting and actually shooting down German Messerschmitt Bf 109's and Focke-Wulf 190's and also shows footage of him strafing German trains, parked aircraft, troop vehicle convoys, buildings...anything helping the German war effort. Apparently when he returned from a mission he persuaded the people removing and developing the combat film to make a copy and add it to the previous missions film clips.
    While watching the DVD (Oct 2018) I don't think I blinked but 2 or 3 times. I was blown away with what I was watching.

    Astonishing!
    That's pretty cool! That plane could take an enormous amount of punishment. Did you ever watch the show "Dogfights"? These were computer animated recreations of air battles set to interviews and stories from surviving pilots and experts. In one of them a German ace in a FW190 pursued a jug and emptied all of his ammo into him and the jug still flew on! The German pilot pulled up beside him, waved, and flew home!

    I think that one's here:
    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6kr0vz
    Last edited by L.M.; 03-29-2020 at 05:54 PM.
    Superbowl 50 MVP Von Miller on February 7th, 2016

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    Quote Originally Posted by L.M. View Post
    That's pretty cool! That plane could take an enormous amount of punishment. Did you ever watch the show "Dogfights"? These were computer animated recreations of air battles set to interviews and stories from surviving pilots and experts. In one of them a German ace in a FW190 pursued a jug and emptied all of his ammo into him and the jug still flew on! The German pilot pulled up beside him, waved, and flew home!
    It sure could take some punishment. It's called American engineering stepping up to the plate saying "really Germany" deal with this bad boy. What a beast. Several years ago the History Channel had a series named "Wings" and it had episodes of real dogfights with American WWII fighter pilots detailing their engagements with German fighters and Japanese fighters. The series had excellent computer simulations of the dog fights that really put you in the cockpit and allowed you to visualize aerial combat through the pilots eyes. Incredibly real life. I wish they would bring back the series. Superb!

    I have a similar story to share in regards to a German pilot being impressed with a banged up, crippled B-17 returning from a raid to Bremen, Germany. It's the story as written by Michael W. Wooten called "The Gallant Foe".

    On December 20, 1943, a German pilot, Oberleutnant L. Frans Stigler encountered a B-17F flown by 2nd Lt. Charles L. Brown on his first mission as a pilot and commander in the 8th Air Force's 379th bomb group. The bomber named 'Ye Olde Pub' had been severely damaged by both flack and subsequent fighter attack and barely able to maintain altitude, was limping back to England. Stigler, flying alone, approached the stricken Fortress and noted the unbelievable amount of damage that the B-17 had sustained. His curiosity brought him so close to the bomber that he could see some badly wounded crewmen aboard. In an uncommon act of chivalry, and at risk of a court marshall, he moved into position off the bomber's right wing and escorted the Fortress out over the North Sea, at which point he saluted the B-17's crew and returned to Germany.

    After a concerted effort to locate the German fighter pilot, former 2nd Lt. Charles L. Brown came face to face with his one time "gallant foe" during a reunion of 8th Air Force bomber crews in Miami, Florida in 1990. Since that time they have become close friends.

    There are a limited edition of 1,000 prints of this encounter with 25 artist proofs and each print has been signed by Oberleutnant Stigler and 2nd Lt. Brown and are suitable for framing.

    Amazing story!
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.M. View Post
    That's pretty cool! That plane could take an enormous amount of punishment. Did you ever watch the show "Dogfights"? These were computer animated recreations of air battles set to interviews and stories from surviving pilots and experts. In one of them a German ace in a FW190 pursued a jug and emptied all of his ammo into him and the jug still flew on! The German pilot pulled up beside him, waved, and flew home!

    I think that one's here:
    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6kr0vz
    My Dad told me that when he was in England, he saw a P-47 coming back from a mission over France with a cylinder blown off the P&W R2800 radial engine. It was till flying, hiccoughing and sputtering, limping in, but man and machine made it home. The Thunderbolt packed a punch with eight .50 caliber machine guns mounted in the wings. That put it close to the Douglas A-26 Invader, a plane my Dad flew. for forward firepower.
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzbodog View Post
    Excellent! There are no "not cool" combat aircraft" that were involved in WWII.
    Although they had some excellent fighting machines, I'm not going to list any German or Japanese aircraft.
    American and British aircraft were superior, IMO.

    My list of favorites:

    Bombers
    B-17G Flying Fortress (USA)
    B-29 Super Fortress (USA)
    Lancaster (British)
    B-24J Liberator (USA)

    Fighters (For those who might not know, the P stands for "Pursuit", the F is for "Fighter")
    P-51 Mustang
    F4U Corsair
    Spitfire (British)
    P-47M Thunderbolt
    P-38J Lightning
    F6F-5 Hellcat

    You assumed correctly. I've seen the movie "Memphis Belle" and I have the DVD. I also have the DVD of "Twelve O'clock High", 1949, staring Gregory Peck. Excellent movie. Winner of 2 academy awards for best supporting actor (Dean Jagger) and best sound.

    I have a friend of 51 years from high school who lives in Windsor, Colorado and we have everything in place for a trip this June to the airshow in Dayton, Ohio and we're also going to the U.S. Air Force Museum located at Wright-Patterson AFB, a little North East of Dayton. The star attraction there is the one and only "Memphis Belle", the real McCoy. My friend and I are super stoked to make this trip but we're starting to think the Coronavirus might force us to cancel for circumstances beyond our control. Huge bummer.

    The following is the final journey of the "Memphis Belle", aka "The Lady", "The Big Bird."

    On 30 August 2005, the MBMA (Memphis Belle Memorial Association) announced that a consultant that they hired determined that the MBMA would not be able to raise enough money to restore the Belle and otherwise fulfill the Air Force's requirements to keep possession of the aircraft. They announced plans to return the aircraft to the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB near Dayton, Ohio, after a final exhibition at an airshow in Millington, Tennessee from 30 September–2 October 2005. The Belle arrived safely at the museum in mid-October 2005 and was placed in one of the Museum's restoration hangars.

    The Museum placed restoration of Memphis Belle near the top of its priorities. In the magazine Friends Journal of the museum's foundation, Major General Charles D. Metcalf, USAF (Ret), then the director of the museum, stated that it might take eight to 10 years to fully restore the aircraft.

    By the spring of 2009, considerable preparatory work had been accomplished, but the fuselage and wings were still disassembled.

    After stripping the paint from the aft fuselage of the aircraft, hundreds of names and personal messages were found scratched in the aluminum skin. It turned out that, during the aircraft's war bond tour, people were allowed to leave their mark there.

    In May 2017 the museum announced the goal of completing the restoration and putting the Memphis Belle on display by May 17, 2018, the 75th anniversary of the plane's 25th mission. On March 19, 2018 the Memphis Belle was moved into the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, and was officially unveiled May 17, 2018.

    Nothing less than incredibly amazing!
    Hey Jazz, have you ever seen the Wings of Freedom Tour?' It's a WWII aircraft "living museum" airshow that visits towns around the country. You can actually fly in a fully renovated original B-24J Liberator (nicknamed "Witchcraft"), or a B-25 Mitchell, or P-51 Mustang.

    For WWII aficionados, I would highly recommend it as a bucket list item.
    "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lumiere View Post
    Hey Jazz, have you ever seen the Wings of Freedom Tour?' It's a WWII aircraft "living museum" airshow that visits towns around the country. You can actually fly in a fully renovated original B-24J Liberator (nicknamed "Witchcraft"), or a B-25 Mitchell, or P-51 Mustang.

    For WWII aficionados, I would highly recommend it as a bucket list item.
    I have. I live in Salt Lake City (moved to Ogden, Utah in 1979) and have resided in SLC for 29 years.
    For the past 12-15 years their are various WWII restored aircraft that come (not every year) and display their coolness to the public. Usually it's B-17's.

    Based on the information from the EXCELLENT book, "Final Cut, Post-War B-17 Flying Fortress and Survivors, copyright 2011,there are 48 B-17's on static / museum display and nearly all of them are in the USA. Approximately 10 of them are flight worthy.

    B-17's
    Sentimental Journey

    Madras Maiden

    Memphis Belle (Not the original - it's a restored F model that was used in the 1990 movie "Memphis Belle"

    Liberty Belle (Lost to a massive fire after an emergency landing in a corn field near Oswego, IL. due to fuel leak, 13 June 2011)

    Nine-O-Nine (Lost due to crash landing shortly after take off at Windsor, Conn., 02 Oct. 2019

    Other WWII Aircraft:
    B-24J Liberator "Dragon and His Tail"
    P-51D Mustang "Newf"
    T-6 Texan trainer
    B-25 Mitchell
    P-40E Warhawk
    Last edited by jazzbodog; 03-28-2020 at 02:23 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzbodog View Post
    Excellent! There are no "not cool" combat aircraft" that were involved in WWII.
    Although they had some excellent fighting machines, I'm not going to list any German or Japanese aircraft.
    American and British aircraft were superior, IMO.

    My list of favorites:

    Bombers
    B-17G Flying Fortress (USA)
    B-29 Super Fortress (USA)
    Lancaster (British)
    B-24J Liberator (USA)

    Fighters (For those who might not know, the P stands for "Pursuit", the F is for "Fighter")
    P-51 Mustang
    F4U Corsair
    Spitfire (British)
    P-47M Thunderbolt
    P-38J Lightning
    F6F-5 Hellcat
    All of the P for "pursuit" designations were renamed to F shortly after the war since functionally there's really not much of a difference.

    My faves:

    Fighters (in no order):

    P-40 B,E, and N Tomahawk/Kittyhawk/Warhawk
    P-51 B,C, and especially D (with the bubble canopy) Mustang
    FW190A
    Me262
    Tempest V
    F6F Hellcat
    P-47 Thunderbolt
    Ki-100

    Bombers:

    B-17G FF
    B-25H -this particular model was a well-protected "flying fortress"
    Ju88 very versatile "jack of all trades" aircraft

    After stripping the paint from the aft fuselage of the aircraft, hundreds of names and personal messages were found scratched in the aluminum skin. It turned out that, during the aircraft's war bond tour, people were allowed to leave their mark there.
    Did they leave them visible? Because that's history too!
    Superbowl 50 MVP Von Miller on February 7th, 2016

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzbodog View Post
    Excellent! There are no "not cool" combat aircraft" that were involved in WWII.
    Although they had some excellent fighting machines, I'm not going to list any German or Japanese aircraft.
    American and British aircraft were superior, IMO.

    My list of favorites:

    Bombers
    B-17G Flying Fortress (USA)
    B-29 Super Fortress (USA)
    Lancaster (British)
    B-24J Liberator (USA)

    Fighters (For those who might not know, the P stands for "Pursuit", the F is for "Fighter")
    P-51 Mustang
    F4U Corsair
    Spitfire (British)
    P-47M Thunderbolt
    P-38J Lightning
    F6F-5 Hellcat
    Those are some of my favorite WWII aircraft, too.

    The Boeing B-17 was designed for precision daylight bombing missions, so it carried a lot of defensive firepower, thirteen Browning M2 .50 cal machine guns with plenty of ammo. Consequently, the bomb load was't as large as other bombers. In contrast, the Avro Lancaster was used for night area bombing missions and had much less defensive weaponry. It had about twice the bomb load of the Flying Fortress. There was a specially modified Lancaster for bombing the hydroelectric dams in the Ruhr Valley using a special "dam buster" bomb which was spun before being dropped, so it would skim across the water and drop into the dammed water side and break it.

    The Boeing B-29 Super Fortress program was more expensive than the Manhattan Project. It had a pressurized cabin, remote controlled turrets and was powered by four Wright R-3350-23 Duplex-Cyclone 18 cylinder turbosupercharged radial engines with four blade propellers.

    The Vought F4U Corsair was made famous by Greg Boyington and VMA-214, the "Black Sheep Squadron" in the South Pacific. I have a copy of Baa Baa Black Sheep autographed by Boyington.

    The Lockheed P-38 Lightning is my favorite USAAF fighter of WWII. It was flown by our leading ace, Richard Bong. Bong was a great pilot, but a bad shot. He used to pull up right behind an opponent and cut loose with the four .50 caliber machine guns and one 20 mm cannon mounted in the nose of the central nacelle.
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    The Vought F4U Corsair was made famous by Greg Boyington and VMA-214, the "Black Sheep Squadron" in the South Pacific. I have a copy of Baa Baa Black Sheep autographed by Boyington.
    Boyington was also one of the original Flying Tigers! [I love them --and it's the only reason the P-40 makes my list.] It's pretty remarkable that he survived being shot down into the Pacific Ocean and the Japanese POW camp.

    The Lockheed P-38 Lightning is my favorite USAAF fighter of WWII. It was flown by our leading ace, Richard Bong. Bong was a great pilot, but a bad shot. He used to pull up right behind an opponent and cut loose with the four .50 caliber machine guns and one 20 mm cannon mounted in the nose of the central nacelle.
    He died testing the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star, the first jet fighter used by the USAAF.
    Superbowl 50 MVP Von Miller on February 7th, 2016

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    My Dad was drafted about a week before Pearl Harbor a month before his 21st birthday. He wanted to fly, but had to wait for that assignment. Before going to flight training in Arkansas (where he met my mother) he trained at Fort Logan, Colorado (where his ashes are now) He ferried different kinds of aircraft (including B-17) in the USAAF and ended up in China flying Curtiss C-46s over The Hump. After WWII, he joined the new USAF and went to fly in the Korean War right after my birth. I grew up on Air Force bases and love airplanes especially WWII ones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    My Dad was drafted about a week before Pearl Harbor a month before his 21st birthday. He wanted to fly, but had to wait for that assignment. Before going to flight training in Arkansas (where he met my mother) he trained at Fort Logan, Colorado (where his ashes are now) He ferried different kinds of aircraft (including B-17) in the USAAF and ended up in China flying Curtiss C-46s over The Hump. After WWII, he joined the new USAF and went to fly in the Korean War right after my birth. I grew up on Air Force bases and love airplanes especially WWII ones.
    "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall."

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    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    My Dad was drafted about a week before Pearl Harbor a month before his 21st birthday. He wanted to fly, but had to wait for that assignment. Before going to flight training in Arkansas (where he met my mother) he trained at Fort Logan, Colorado (where his ashes are now) He ferried different kinds of aircraft (including B-17) in the USAAF and ended up in China flying Curtiss C-46s over The Hump. After WWII, he joined the new USAF and went to fly in the Korean War right after my birth. I grew up on Air Force bases and love airplanes especially WWII ones.
    That's fascinating, Sam! For those who don't know, "the Hump" was the Himalaya Mountains.

    The USA provided support to Chiang Kai Shek and his nationalist Chinese army based in Chungking and Kunming. Originally this support flowed into Rangoon and then up the Burma Road, though passes in the mountains arduously carved out by the Chinese people using hand tools. The American Volunteer Group (famously nick-named "The Flying Tigers") defended this route in their P-40 fighter planes decorated with shark or tiger mouths.

    After the Japanese seized Rangoon in 1942, flying supplies in over the Hump was their only recourse for helping the Chinese until 1944 when a new road was built from Ledo, India to intersect with the old Burma Road. Many battles were fought along the way and all of this is recounted in an excellent wartime documentary called The Stilwell Road (US Army General Joseph Stilwell supervised construction) narrated by Ronald Reagan. That can be seen here.
    Superbowl 50 MVP Von Miller on February 7th, 2016

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